ADHD and Bedwetting: Supplement Reviews

  1. Growth Spurt: Protein needed!

Not all ADHD children have low muscle tone, but all ADHD children do have muscles and do require protein for them to function normally.

At age 4, my son and I visited a child disability clinic. Potty training was still a dream at this point.

A four-year-old boy that is not potty trained is nothing to be concerned about. The fact that my boy had low muscle tone and didn’t like meat is what prompted the clinic nutritionist to suggest giving my son a protein powder. She recommended two protein products: Beneprotein and Propass.

Beneprotein, a whey protein isolate, became our breakfast drink of choice. 1 ½ scoops mixed with my son’s morning glass of apple juice gave him the protein boost he needed. His muscles tone improved, and so did his daytime bathroom success. Yay us!

Ten years later, my son’s protein consumption during mealtime has improved and he no longer drinks Beneprotein with breakfast. When a bedwetting relapse occurs more than once in a week, I can almost guarantee he is having a growth spurt.

How do I combat the growth spurt? I feed him hamburgers (homemade), chicken strips, any meal that he likes that his high in protein. Skip the fries – fries will add to the problem rather than help (see inflammation below).

2. Irritated Gut: The curse of the Free gas-station popcorn

popcorn hulls irritate the gut. Their high fiber content makes them hard to digest and sometimes they plain and simply get stuck and cause friction in the gut.

Metamucil Thins/Wafers became our new best friend. Upon consumption, the psyllium seeds (the active ingredient) in the wafer turn into a thick gel. The gel coats the inside of the intestines and collects any hard, indigestible matter (like popcorn hulls) that have gotten stuck. The gel and the seeds get passed out with bowel movements.

The school graciously agreed to offer my son alternatives to popcorn, and I started giving Metamucil Wafers to my son periodically to keep his gut clean.

Even today, almost a decade later, I still offer Metamucil Wafers whenever I notice an urgent bathroom trip. Spasms still happen. The difference is he now can make it to the bathroom in time.  Maintaining good gut health is paramount to maintaining a healthy urinary system.

3. Less Inflammation, Please

So many things can cause inflammation. Milk, red meat, fats, gluten, sugar, processed foods, need I go on? There are many products out there that claim to reduce inflammation. My chiropractic neurologist frequently reminds me that these products may help reduce inflammation, but for more complete relief the source of the inflammation must be removed from the diet.  

The product my chiropractic neurologist recommended was a powder that needed to be mixed with liquid before consumption. He mixed up a batch in his office and let us try some. It was okay, so I brought a package home to experiment with.

Interestingly enough, both bedwetting and focus improved. (Was it the powder? You decide.)

The powder contains a prebiotic, or a fiber that acts as a landing pad for good bacteria. Mixing the powder with just water or juice results in a rather gritty drink.

This is why I mixed the powder into thick breakfast shakes. The thickness hid the grit.

Once school started, I found myself short on time. Over time I quit making the breakfast shakes.

That proved to be a mistake. My son started struggling with academics, had increased bathroom accidents, and more wet nights. See, his fourth-grade teacher was much more demanding that his third-grade teacher. She believed in packing every moment of every day with learning activities. There was minimal down time.

The school, and the teacher, started asking what changed. My son was requiring more time outs in the quiet room and more special one-on-one care. The teacher was frustrated. I was frustrated.

I made an appointment with our chiropractic neurologist. He recommended that I reintroduce the inflammation-reducing breakfast shake and life got better.

I also figured out an easier way to give the powder to my son: pudding snacks. I know pudding is not an ideal breakfast food, but it’s the perfect medium to disguise a gritty powder.

We like mixing ½ to 1 scoop of the powder mixed with 1 pudding snack. The scoop is provided.

Here are our two favorite flavor combinations:

  • Chocolate flavored powder mixed with butterscotch pudding
  • Mango flavored powder mixed with chocolate pudding

This inflammation-reducing powder worked for us. I am a mom, not a doctor. I am sharing what has helped me with my journey. I can’t guarantee you will see the same results, but it’s worth the try.

This was my first encounter with the theory of the Gut-Brain Connection and the relationship between a healthy gut and a healthy brain. We saw first-hand how reducing the inflammation of the gut directly impacted my son’s focus and his bladder control. In the words of his doctor, “I don’t know which ingredient in here is working, but something is!”

There is so much more to say about inflammation, ADHD, and a healthy body. This topic I will definitely revisit later.

As my practitioner’s website states: These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

ADHD, Bedwetting, and Bathroom Accidents, continued

  1. Growth Spurt: Protein needed!

Not all ADHD children have low muscle tone, but all ADHD children do have muscles and do require protein for them to function normally.

At age 4, my son and I visited a child disability clinic. Potty training was still a dream at this point.

A four-year-old boy that is having difficulty potty trained is nothing to be concerned about. My son’s low muscle tone and meat avoidance is what prompted the clinic nutritionist to suggest a protein powder. The nutritionist recommended two protein products: Beneprotein and Propass.

Beneprotein, a whey protein isolate, became our breakfast drink of choice. 1 ½ scoops mixed with my son’s morning glass of apple juice gave him the protein boost he needed. His muscles tone improved, as did his daytime bathroom success. Yay us!

Over the years, mealtime protein consumption improved and my son no longer drinks Beneprotein with breakfast.

When a bedwetting relapse occurs more than one time in a week, I can almost guarantee he is having a growth spurt.

How do I combat growth spurt relaspses? I feed hamburgers (homemade), chicken strips, any meal that he likes that his high in protein. Skip the fries – fries will add to the problem rather than help (see inflammation below).

2. Irritated Gut: The curse of the Free gas-station popcorn

Popcorn was the cause of my son’s bladder spasms and diarhea.

The why: popcorn hulls irritate the gut. Their high fiber content makes them hard to digest and sometimes they plain and simply get stuck or cause friction/irritation in the gut.

Metamucil Wafers became our new best friend. Once consumed, the psyllium seeds in the Metamucil wafer turn into a thick gel. The gel then coats the inside of the intestines and collects any hard, indigestible matter (like popcorn hulls) that have gotten stuck. The gel is also soothing to the gut lining, reducing irritation. The gel and the seeds both get elimated from the body via bowel movements.

Once I explained the problem to my school, they graciously agreed to offer my son alternatives to popcorn, and I started giving routine doses of Metamucil Wafers to my son to keep his gut clean.

Even today, almost a decade later, I still offer Metamucil Wafers whenever I notice an urgent bathroom trip. Random food item still get stuck in his gut, spasms still sometimes happen. The difference is he now can make it to the bathroom in time.

 Maintaining good gut health is paramount to maintaining a healthy urinary system.

3. Less Inflammation, Please

So many things can cause inflammation. Milk, red meat, fats, gluten, sugar, processed foods, need I go on? There are many products out there that claim to reduce inflammation.

My chiropractic neurologist frequently reminds me that these supplements can reduce inflammation, but for more complete relief the source of the inflammation must be removed from the diet.  

One product my chiropractic neurologist recommended for reducing inflamation came in powder form. Said powder needed to be mixed with a liquid (like water, juice, or a shake) before consumption.

The powder itself is rather gritty. This is why I mixed the powder into thick breakfast shakes. The thickness hid the grit.

Both bedwetting and focus improved during this period when I made shakes each morning. 

Once school started, I found myself short on time. At the beginning of the school year, I made shakes faithfully each morning. Over time, I quit making the breakfast shakes.

That proved to be a mistake.  See, his fourth-grade teacher was much more demanding that his third-grade teacher. She believed in packing every moment of every day with learning activities. There was minimal down time.

My son started struggling with academics, had increased bathroom accidents, and more wet nights.

The school, and the teacher, started asking what changed. My son was requiring more time outs in the quiet room and more special one-on-one care. The teacher was frustrated. I was frustrated.

I revisited our chiropractic neurologist. He recommended that I reintroduce the inflammation-reducing powder and life got better.

I also figured out an easier way to give the powder to my son: pudding snacks. I know pudding is not an ideal breakfast food, but it’s thickness makes the perfect medium to disguise a gritty powder.

We like mixing ½ to 1 scoop (provided) of the powder mixed with 1 pudding snack. 

Here are our two favorite flavor combinations:

  • Chocolate flavored powder mixed with butterscotch pudding
  • Mango flavored powder mixed with chocolate pudding

Reducing inflammation worked for us. I am a mom, not a doctor. I am sharing what has helped me with my journey. I can’t guarantee you will see the same results, but it’s worth the try.

This was my first encounter with the theory of the Gut-Brain Connection and the relationship between a healthy gut and a healthy brain. We saw first-hand how reducing the inflammation of the gut directly impacted my son’s focus and his bladder control. In the words of his doctor, “I don’t know which ingredient in here is working, but something is!”

There is so much more to say about inflammation, ADHD, and a healthy body. This topic I will definitely revisit later.

Note: None my these statements have been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Close Menu